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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18138

Title: Inhaled Hypertonic Saline (7%) improves the Lung Clearance Index in CF Paediatric Patients with FEV1% predicted ≥ 80%
Authors: Amin, Reshma
Advisor: Corey, Mary
Department: Health Policy, Management and Evaluation
Keywords: Hypertonic Saline
Cystic Fibrosis
Issue Date: 14-Dec-2009
Abstract: Objective: To determine if inhaled Hypertonic Saline (7%) improves the Lung Clearance Index in paediatric Cystic Fibrosis patients with FEV1 ≥80% predicted. Methods: In a blinded crossover trial, twenty CF patients received 4 weeks of hypertonic saline (7%) (HS) and 4 weeks of isotonic saline (0.9%) (IS) separated by a 4 week washout period. The primary endpoint was the change in LCI in the HS versus the IS treatment periods. Results: Four weeks of twice daily inhalation of HS significantly improved the LCI as compared to IS by 1.16, 95% CI [0.26, 2.05]; p=0.016. Baseline LCI before IS, 8.71+/-2.10, was not significantly different from baseline LCI before HS inhalation, 8.84+/-1.95 (p=0.73). Randomization order had no significant impact on the treatment effect (p=0.61). Conclusions: Four weeks of twice daily Hypertonic Saline (7%) inhalations improved the LCI and may be a suitable early intervention therapy for CF patients with mild disease.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18138
Appears in Collections:Master
The Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation - Master theses

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