test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
School of Graduate Studies - Theses >
Master >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18145

Title: Synthetic Studies on Palladium-Catalyzed Olefin Dioxygenation, Indole Functionalization, and Helical Ligands
Authors: Antonic, Marija
Advisor: Dong, Vy Maria
Department: Chemistry
Keywords: palladium catalysis
olefin dioxygenation
indole functionalization
helical ligand
vicinal oxidation
hammett study
synthetic organic chemistry
transition metal catalysis
Issue Date: 15-Dec-2009
Abstract: Palladium-catalyzed olefin dioxygenation is a powerful tool in the generation of complex and valuable substrates, one which may become complimentary to the well known Sharpless dihydroxylation. In this work the mechanism of this transformation is examined via reaction kinetics and Hammett studies, which corroborate a PdII/IV catalytic cycle and suggest that the rate determining step is the oxidation of PdII to PdIV. Olefin dioxygenation was also found to proceed in the presence of catalytic quantities of BF3•OEt2 or triflic acid, with stoichiometric hypervalent iodine oxidant and an acetic acid solvent. Furthermore, asymmetric variants of intramolecular palladium-catalyzed olefin dioxygenation were also investigated, which resulted in the formation of tetrahydrofuran products in up to 36% ee. Next, chelate-assisted C–H bond functionalization of indoles at the C7 position and of carbazoles at the C1 position was investigated with a variety of arylation, halogenation and oxygenation techniques. Lastly, our efforts towards the synthesis of a mono-phosphine based [5]helicene ligand via olefin metathesis and photocyclization strategies will be discussed.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18145
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Chemistry - Master theses

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Antonic_Marija_200911_MSc_thesis.pdf8.18 MBAdobe PDF
View/Open

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft