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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18151

Title: Intelligent Ad Resizing
Authors: Badali, Anthony Paul
Advisor: Aarabi, Parham
Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering
Keywords: Image Resizing
Saliency
Energy-Based Models
Cropping
Issue Date: 15-Dec-2009
Abstract: Currently, online advertisements are created for specific dimensions and must be laboriously modified by advertisers to support different aspect ratios. In addition, publishers are constrained to design web pages to accommodate this limited set of sizes. As an alternative we present a framework for automatically generating visual banners at arbitrary sizes based on individual prototype ads. This technique can be used to create flexible visual ads that can be resized to accommodate various aspect ratios. In the proposed framework image and text data are stored separately. Resizing involves selecting a sub-region of the original image and updating text parameters (size and position). This problem is posed within an optimization framework that encourages solutions which maintain important structural properties of the original ad. The method can be applied to advertisements containing a wide variety of imagery and provides significantly more flexibility than existing solutions.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18151
Appears in Collections:Master
The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering - Master theses

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