test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
School of Graduate Studies - Theses >
Master >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18164

Title: Hepatocyte Cytotoxicity Induced by Hydroperoxide (Oxidative Stress Model) or Dicarbonyls (Carbonylation Model): Prevention by Bioactive Nut Extracts or Catechins
Authors: Banach, Monica Sofia
Advisor: O'Brien, Peter J.
Jenkins, David J. A.
Department: Pharmaceutical Sciences
Keywords: Nut Extracts, Catechins, Cytotoxicity, Oxidative Stress, Lipid Peroxidation, Protein Carbonylation
Issue Date: 16-Dec-2009
Abstract: Carbonyl and oxidative stress augment the development of diabetic complications. We evaluated the cytoprotectiveness of walnut and hazelnut extracts and catechins for decreasing cytotoxicity, lipid peroxidation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, and protein carbonylation in cell death models of carbonyl and oxidative stress. Polar extracts (methanol or water) showed better cytoprotection than the non-polar (ethyl acetate) nut extracts against hydroperoxide-induced hepatocyte cell death and oxidative stress markers. Catechin flavonoids found in plants, including walnuts and hazelnuts, prevented serum albumin carbonylation in a carbonyl stress model (using glyoxal or methylglyoxal). Hepatocyte protein carbonylation and cell death were prevented and UV spectra data suggested a catechin:methylglyoxal adduct was formed. We conclude that (a) bioactive nut constituents in polar extracts were more protective than non-polar extracts against oxidative stress, and (b) catechins were effective under physiological temperature and pH, at preventing dicarbonyl induced cytotoxicity likely by trapping dicarbonyls or reversing early stage carbonylation.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18164
Appears in Collections:Master
Leslie L. Dan Faculty of Pharmacy - Master theses

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Banach_Monica_S_200911_MSc_Thesis.pdf1.4 MBAdobe PDF
View/Open

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft