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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18228

Title: Multicohort Management and LiDAR: New Forest Management Tools for Northeastern Ontario Boreal Mixedwood Bird Communities
Authors: Burrell, Michael
Advisor: Malcolm, Jay R.
Drapeau, Pierre
Department: Forestry
Keywords: Multicohort Management
bird
Boreal
Forestry
forest structure
vertical stratification
LiDAR
multiscale analysis
Issue Date: 11-Jan-2010
Abstract: While traditional management of the boreal forests results in even-aged forests with low landscape scale variability, recent work has suggested that much of the eastern boreal forest of North America is subject to long natural fire return-intervals. This has led to the development of new management strategies to maintain a mosaic of even and multi-aged stands. In this context I investigated the relationships between diameter-distributions, stand age, forest structure and bird communities. Results showed weak associations of the bird community with cohort classes, but that diameter-distributions can work to succinctly describe some of the variation in stand structure and bird communities. I also explored the utility of LiDAR to measure important structural features for bird communities. Results showed that LiDAR can outperform traditional measures of stand structure at explaining bird communities at differing scales.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18228
Appears in Collections:Master
Faculty of Forestry - Master theses

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