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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18229

Title: Homeostatic Beliefs: Measurement and Future Applications
Authors: Burton, Caitlin
Advisor: Plaks, Jason
Peterson, Jordan
Department: Psychology
Keywords: Beliefs
Scale validation
Issue Date: 11-Jan-2010
Abstract: “Homeostatic beliefs” (HBs) denote a sense that one’s life path will remain stable in the long-term despite short-term disruptions. Two studies have been undertaken to explore whether HBs exist independent of other constructs, and to develop a scale with which to measure them. In Study 1, 158 undergraduate students completed a draft HB scale and theoretically related scales. Convergent and divergent validity were assessed with correlational and regression analyses: HBs are most strongly related to, but not redundant with, optimism, trait extraversion, and satisfaction with life. Using exploratory factor analysis, a six-item HB scale was derived. Study 2 is in progress, and will assess the construct validity of the HB scale by attempting to manipulate HBs to possibly influence individuals’ reactions to a mortality salience manipulation. We hypothesize that high HBs may buffer individuals from transient disrupting stimuli such as a mortality salience cue.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18229
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Psychology - Master theses

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