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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18255

Title: High Speed Homodyne Detector for Gaussian-modulated Coherent-state Quantum Key Distribution
Authors: Chi, Yuemeng
Advisor: Lo, Hoi-Kwong
Qian, Li
Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering
Keywords: Quantum key distribution
Homodyne detection
Issue Date: 13-Jan-2010
Abstract: We developed a high speed homodyne detector in the telecommunication wavelength region for a Gaussian-modulated coherent-state quantum key distribution experiment. We are able to achieve a 100 MHz bandwidth, ultra-low electronic noise and pulse-resolved homodyne detector. The bandwidth of this homodyne detector has reached the same order of magnitude of the best homodyne detectors reported. By overcoming photodiode response functions mismatch, choosing proper laser sources, ensuring the homodyne detector linearity and stabilizing the homodyne detection system, we demonstrate that the homodyne detector has a 10 dB shot-noise-to-electronic-noise ratio in the time domain at a local oscillator of 5.4*10^8 photons/pulse at a laser repetition rate of 10 MHz. With this homodyne detector, we expect to ncrease our GMCS QKD experiment speed by 100 times, which will improve the key generation rate by 1-2 orders of magnitude.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18255
Appears in Collections:Master
The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering - Master theses

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