test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
School of Graduate Studies - Theses >
Master >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18256

Title: RBF Based Responsive Stimulators To Control Epilepsy
Authors: Colic, Sinisa
Advisor: Bardakjian, Berj
Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering
Keywords: Epilepsy
Responsive Stimulation
Control
Cognitive Rhythm Generator
Seizure
Seizure Like-Events
Issue Date: 13-Jan-2010
Abstract: Deep Brain Simulation (DBS) has received attention in the scientific community for its potential to suppress epileptic seizures. To date, DBS has only achieved marginal positive results. We believe that a highly complex possibly chaotic (HPC) biologically inspired stimulation is superior to periodic stimulation. Using Radial Basis Functions (RBFs), we modeled interictal and postictal time series based on electroencephalograms (EEGs) of rat hippocampus slices while under low Mg2+. We then compared the RBF based interictal and postictal stimulations to the periodic stimulation using a Cognitive Rhythm Generator (CRG) model for spontaneous Seizure-Like Events (SLEs). What resulted was a significant improvement in seizure suppression with the HPC stimulators at lower gains as opposed to the periodic signal. This suggests that the use of biologically inspired HPC stimulators will achieve better results while confining the stimulation to a narrow region of the brain.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18256
Appears in Collections:Master
The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering - Master theses

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Colic_Sinisa_200911_MASc_thesis.pdf619.12 kBAdobe PDF
View/Open

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft