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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18265

Title: The Relations of Stress and Parental Sensitivity to Deferred Imitation in Infants
Authors: Cordick, Jennifer
Advisor: Haley, David
Fleming, Alison S.
Department: Psychology
Keywords: infants
stress
cortisol
imitation
memory
parenting
Issue Date: 13-Jan-2010
Abstract: The current study compared infant cortisol responses during the still-face procedure with those shown during other parent-infant interactions. It also examined how stress hormones can affect memory retention. Six-month-old infants (n = 38) were exposed to either a repeated still-face procedure, normal face-to-face interaction, or a divided-attention task. Salivary cortisol was collected at multiple time points. Infants were assigned to a memory demonstration (n = 30) or a no-demonstration (n = 8) group. Infants in the demonstration group were shown 3 target actions with a puppet, and subsequently given a chance to repeat the target actions. Infants in the no demonstration group were not shown the target actions. Only the infants who experienced the still-face procedure showed a significant change in salivary cortisol throughout the procedure. Cortisol values did not significantly predict memory performance. There are still many questions regarding how stress induction during memory consolidation affects memory performance.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18265
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Psychology - Master theses

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