test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
School of Graduate Studies - Theses >
Master >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18278

Title: Tactile Cues in the Control of Action: An Emphasis on Movement Initiation
Authors: Diamond, Jonathan
Advisor: Tremblay, Luc
Department: Exercise Sciences
Keywords: Goal-directed movement
Perception
Issue Date: 14-Jan-2010
Abstract: The ability to detect a tactile stimulus during movement is markedly decreased (e.g., tactile gating), yet it is unknown whether the stimulus influences motor output. In the present study, participants moved a mechanical slider as quickly and as accurately as possible to a target. Participants received low-level electrical stimulation on the index finger of the reaching limb at various offsets relative to movement initiation. Participants reported whether they perceived the tactile cue. It was hypothesized that the detection of the stimulus would be reduced and the stimulus would influence motor output. First, a typical time course and magnitude of sensory gating was found, supporting previous observations (e.g., Chapman & Beauchamp, 2006). Second, no influence of the stimulation on motor output was observed. It was concluded that the detection of tactile cues during a goal-directed reaching task is attenuated and this stimulation does not influence motor output.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18278
Appears in Collections:Master
Graduate Department of Exercise Sciences - Master theses

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Diamond_Jonathan_S_200911_MSc_thesis.pdf679.01 kBAdobe PDF
View/Open

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft