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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18286

Title: Outcomes of Children Receiving In-hospital Resuscitation
Authors: Ebrahim, Shanil
Advisor: Parshuram, Christopher
Department: Medical Science
Keywords: 0766
0564
Issue Date: 15-Jan-2010
Abstract: Introduction: This thesis prospectively evaluated the cognitive and functional outcomes and health-related quality of life of children admitted urgently to a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) at the Hospital for Sick Children. Methods: The primary outcome was the Vineland Adaptive Behavioural Scale (VABS-2) measured at 1-month and secondary outcomes were health-related quality of life, daily functioning, and caregiver perceptions. Results: 56 children and 66 caregivers were enrolled; 42 (75%) patients and 49 (74%) caregivers completed the 1-month assessment. Children in the PICU had a mean VABS-2 score of 85(+25). Daily functioning outcomes did not significantly change from baseline to 1-month. In comparison to baseline, children had significantly reduced health-related quality of life at 1-week but no significant change was found at 1-month. Discussion: Children surviving PICU have significant cognitive morbidity and reduced health-related quality of life that is exacerbated by more intense modes of resuscitation and increasing severity of illness.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18286
Appears in Collections:Master
Institute of Medical Science - Master theses

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