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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18307

Title: Evaluation of Chemiluminescence as a Measurement Option for Industrial Flame Monitoring and Process Control
Authors: Geddis, Philip James
Advisor: Thomson, Murray J.
Department: Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Keywords: chemiluminescence
flame monitoring
pyrometry
basic oxygen furnace
biomass
combustion
Issue Date: 19-Jan-2010
Abstract: Ultraviolet-visible chemiluminescent emission features in laboratory-scale flames have been shown by several researchers to correlate well with the flame's equivalence ratio, and it has been suggested that this relation could be used to actively control flames. This study investigated the feasibility of extending this knowledge to the industrial setting. Radiative emissions from basic oxygen furnace (BOF) and thermal generating station burner flames were mainly characterized by thermally-induced greybody spectra; emissions from electronically excited species of OH*, OH*, and CO2* were generally weak and did not offer any unique information that could be used as part of a flame diagnostic system. A sub-study which assessed the impact of biomass cofiring demonstrated that emissions of SO2, NOx, and fossil-CO2 could be reduced with direct fuel replacement. The sensor system could be used as a pyrometer, and as part of a burner balancing strategy to counter increased CO emissions and decreased efficiency.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18307
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering - Master theses

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