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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18314

Title: A New Technology for the Anaerobic Digestion of Organic Waste
Authors: Guilford, Nigel
Advisor: Goodfellow, Howard
Department: Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry
Keywords: Organic waste
Anaerobic digestion
Issue Date: 19-Jan-2010
Abstract: The development and patenting of a new technology for the anaerobic digestion of solid waste is described. The design basis is explained and justified by extensive reference to the literature. The technology was specifically designed to be versatile, robust and affordable and is directly derived from other proven processes for organic waste management. The ways in which environmental regulations directly affect the development and commercialization of organic waste processing technologies are described. The great differences in regulations between Europe and North America are analyzed to explain why anaerobic digestion is common in Europe and rare in North America and why this is the result of waste management economics which are driven by these regulations. The new technology is shown to be competitive in the Province of Ontario in particular and North America in general; a detailed financial analysis and comparison with European technologies is provided in support of this conclusion.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18314
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry - Master theses

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