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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18336

Title: The Role of Civil Society Organizations in the Net Neutrality Debate in Canada and the United States
Authors: Harpham, Bruce
Advisor: Clement, Andrew
Caidi, Nadia
Department: Information Studies
Keywords: Internet policy
telecommunications regulation
Canada
United States
information policy
network neutrality
frame analysis
Internet
Issue Date: 25-Jan-2010
Abstract: This thesis investigates the policy frames employed by civil society organizations (CSOs) in the network neutrality debate in Canada and the United States. Network neutrality is defined as restrictions on Internet Service Providers (ISPs) to respect freedom of expression on the Internet and not seek to prevent innovative competition nor control the services or content available to users. The primary question under investigation is the policy frames of CSOs in the debate. The second question is whether CSOs have influenced policy outcomes in either legislation or regulation. The focus of the analysis is on regulatory agencies (CRTC and FCC); proposed legislation in Parliament and Congress is also analyzed as well. By examining the arguments advanced by various policy participants (government, ISPs, and CSOs), common points can be identified that may help the participants come to agreement.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18336
Appears in Collections:Master
Information Program - Master theses

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