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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18340

Title: Carbon Copies: The United States, Eu ETS and Linkage
Authors: Higham, Benjamin
Advisor: Green, Andrew
Department: Law
Keywords: law
emission trading
linking
carbon
Issue Date: 26-Jan-2010
Abstract: Although many nations have recognized the need to protect the Earth’s climate, human activities are continuing to result in a change in greenhouse gas levels that threaten to result in a detrimental change in the Earth’s climate in terms of ongoing human life. The EU ETS has been developed and implemented in Europe as a key tool to meet the goals set by the Kyoto Protocol. Much political debate has arisen in recent years regarding the implementation of a carbon-trading regime in the United States. Many commentators have recognized that the success of any proposed carbon regime will be determined by how well it is tailored to fit certain economic realities in the United States. However, the adequacy of proposed carbon trading frameworks with regard to potential linkage to existing systems, namely the EU ETS, raises additional considerations. My study seeks to expose these considerations for debate and determine whether existing political considerations in the United States are adequate for the establishment of future linkages or whether further measures are required.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18340
Appears in Collections:Master
Faculty of Law - Master theses

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