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T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
University Professors >
Kennedy, John M. >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18758

Title: Angle illusion on a picture's surface
Authors: Hammad, Sherief
Kennedy, John M.
Juricevic, Igor
Rajani, Shazma
Keywords: perspective
illusion
pictures
cubes
angles
Gregory
Arnheim
drawing
eye convergence
judgment
visual perception
Issue Date: 2008
Publisher: Brill Academic Publishers
Citation: Hammad, S., Kennedy, J. M., Juricevic, I., & Rajani, S. (2008). Angle illusion on a picture's surface. Spatial Vision, 21(3-5), 451-462.
Abstract: Shapes on picture surfaces are not seen accurately (Arnheim, 1954). In particular, if they depict 3-D forms, angles between lines on a picture surface are misperceived. To test four theories of the misperception, subjects estimated acute and obtuse internal angles of quadrilaterals. Each quadrilateral was shown alone or as part of a drawing of a cube. The drawings showed the tops of the cubes, tilted at various angles around a horizontal axis. This generated different acute and obtuse angles in the drawings. Compared to a quadrilateral on its own, judgments of the acute and obtuse angles in the cube drawings were biased towards 90°. The bias was present over a wide range of intermediate tilts. The results support a perspective convergence theory and run counter to 'Extreme Foreshortening', Gestalt and Cognitive theories.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18758
ISBN: 0169-1015
Appears in Collections:Kennedy, John M.

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