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T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18774

Title: Investigation of Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymer Reinforcing Bars as Internal Reinforcement for Concrete Structures
Authors: Johnson, David Tse Chuen
Advisor: Sheikh, Shamim A.
Department: Civil Engineering
Keywords: Reinforced Concrete
GFRP
Issue Date: 12-Feb-2010
Abstract: A study of the existing data shows that two areas of GFRP bar research among others are in need of investigation, the first being behaviour of GFRP bars at cold temperatures and the second being the behaviour of large diameter GFRP rods. Based on the results of experimental work performed, cold temperatures were found to have minimal effect on the mechanical properties of the GFRP bars tested. In addition, through beam testing, large 32mm diameter GFRP bars were found to not fail prematurely due to interlaminar shear failure. By evaluating the mechanical and durability properties of GFRP bars and behaviour of GFRP RC, it can be concluded that GFRP appears to be an adequate alternative reinforcement for concrete structures. Because of high strength, low stiffness and elastic behaviour of GFRP bars, issues of significant importance for reinforced concrete are bond development, influence of shear on member behaviour and member deformability.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18774
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Civil Engineering - Master theses

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