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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18784

Title: A Study of Intermittent Buoyancy Induced Flow Phenomena in CANDU Fuel Channels
Authors: Karchev, Zheko
Advisor: Kawaji, Masahiro
Department: Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry
Keywords: CANDU Reactor, two-phase flow
Issue Date: 12-Feb-2010
Abstract: The present work focuses on the study of two-phase flow behavior called “Intermittent Buoyancy Induced Flow” (IBIF) resulting from the loss of coolant circulation in a CANDU nuclear reactor core. The main objectives are to study steam bubble formation and migration through the pressure tube and into the feeder tubes and headers, and to study the effect of pressure tube sagging on the two-phase flow behavior during IBIF. Experiments are conducted using air and water flow at atmospheric pressure to qualitatively examine the IBIF phenomena. The test showed oscillating periodic behavior in the void fraction as the air vents. In addition to this, a mathematical model based on a simplified momentum balance for the liquid and gas phases was formulated. The model was further solved and compared to the experimental data. The model predictions showed a reasonable agreement within the investigated range of void fractions.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18784
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry - Master theses

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