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T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18806

Title: Two-dimensional Barcodes for Mobile Phones
Authors: Lyons, Sarah
Advisor: Kschischang, Frank R.
Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering
Keywords: communication
phone
barcode
wireless
camera
channel model
Issue Date: 15-Feb-2010
Abstract: There are several potential applications for a high data density barcode that can be easily photographed and decoded by mobile phones, but no such symbology currently exists. As a result, a new barcode was designed to exploit the low-pass characteristic of a camera phone channel and is presented as a means of facilitating wireless optical communication with mobile phones. A channel model was established and subsequent simulation results led to the design of a colour barcode with encoding done in the Discrete Cosine Transform domain. A waterfilling process and a noise-shaping algorithm enhance performance, while a new fast acquisition method allows for rotational and size invariance. An outer Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate code is employed, followed by an inner Reed Muller code with a rate varying according to spatial frequency. The final barcode data-density is 3.5 times greater than the leading symbology and has proven robust to various impediments imposed by camera phones.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18806
Appears in Collections:Master
The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering - Master theses

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