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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18809

Title: Reducing Complexity of Liver Cancer Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy
Authors: Lee, Mark Tiong Yew
Advisor: Dawson, Laura
Department: Medical Science
Keywords: Liver Cancer
Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy
Issue Date: 15-Feb-2010
Abstract: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can potentially increase the dose delivered to liver tumours while sparing normal tissues from dose. More complex IMRT, with more modulation of the radiation beam is more susceptible to geometric and dosimetric uncertainties than simpler radiotherapy plans. Simple breath-hold liver IMRT using few radiation beam segments (<30) was investigated in 27 patients to determine the quality of treatment in terms of tumour dose coverage and normal tissue sparing as compared to index IMRT using >30 segments. In all 27 plans number of segments was reduced to <30 without compromising tumour coverage or normal tissue dose constraints, at the expense of dose conformity. Delivered tumour and normal tissue dose did not differ statistically between IMRT plans when accounting for treatment residual geometric error. This research supports considering the use of simple IMRT for treatment of liver cancer, except when loss of dose conformation is undesirable (i.e. very high doses).
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18809
Appears in Collections:Master
Institute of Medical Science - Master theses

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