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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18811

Title: Injury and Neighborhood Marginalization: Does it Matter Where You Live?
Authors: Lee, Patricia Pui Shuen
Advisor: Nathens, Avery B.
Urbach, David Robert
Department: Health Policy, Management and Evaluation
Keywords: Injury
Injuries
Neighborhood
Neighbourhood
Neighborhood marginalization
Neighbourhood marginalization
Marginalization
urban
Ontario
Unintentional injuries
Intentional injuries
Assaults
Self-inflicted injuries
Residential instability
Material deprivation
Ethnic diversity
Dependency
Issue Date: 15-Feb-2010
Abstract: Background: Injury is an enormous public health problem in Canada. Recent studies have suggested that characteristics of the residential environment, particularly neighborhood marginalization, may be important in determining injury risk. Objective: To determine whether there is an association between neighborhood marginalization and injury in the largest urban cities of Ontario. Methods: A retrospective, cross-sectional, ecological study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between neighborhood marginalization and injury in 0-64 year olds who resided in the ten largest cities of Ontario between 2003-2005. Results: Neighborhoods with high levels of ethnic diversity had significantly lower rates of unintentional injuries, neighborhoods with high levels of material deprivation had significantly higher rates of assaults, and neighborhoods with high levels of residential instability and material deprivation had significantly higher rates of self-inflicted injuries in adults. Conclusions: The association between neighborhood marginalization and injury differs depending on the type of injury examined.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18811
Appears in Collections:Master
The Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation - Master theses

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