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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18847

Title: Structural Characterization, Optimization, and Failure Analysis of a Human-powered Ornithopter
Authors: Robertson, Cameron David
Advisor: DeLaurier, James D.
Department: Aerospace Science and Engineering
Keywords: FEA
highly-flexible
ornithopter
Composites
Failure Analysis
Human-Powered Aircraft
HALE
Issue Date: 15-Feb-2010
Abstract: The objective of this work was to develop an analysis framework for the structural design of the Human-Powered Ornithopter (HPO). This framework was used in a kinematicaerostructural optimizer for apping-wing ight (Ornithia), as well as analytically to design the HPO, and focused on three goals. First was the development of an accurate and computationally inexpensive nite-element method, to be integrated with Ornithia, which would capture the geometric nonlinearity of the aerostructural interaction of the wing when subjected the large deformations in ight. Second was the assembly of a model by which the aircraft primary structure, the wing main spar especially, could be exactly characterized and designed. Third was the establishment of a process and toolbox for failure analysis which could be applied universally in the design of the HPO. The validation and tuning of these models involved extensive testing on prototype carbon ber composite components.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18847
Appears in Collections:Master
Institute for Aerospace Studies - Master theses

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