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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18850

Title: The Impact of Infant Crying and Soothability on Cognition
Authors: Ryan Harrison, Maireanne
Advisor: Haley, David
Department: Psychology
Keywords: Mother-Infant Relationships
Issue Date: 15-Feb-2010
Abstract: Perception of infant crying has been linked to the brain regions that are activated with stress and conflict monitoring, such as the anterior cingulate and amygdala. Whether the stress of cry perception affects cognitive processes is heretofore unknown. This research combines an experimental paradigm of an unsoothable infant cry task (Donovan, Leavitt, & Taylor, 2005) with a series of Rejection Stroop tasks (Dandeneau & Baldwin, 2004) with the expectation that perception of infant distress would deplete neural resources underlying the regulation of attention. Two studies were conducted on non-parent young adults and two studies were conducted on mothers of infants. Results indicated that the cry task causes negative affect and cognitive interference in non-parent young adults to a greater extent than does a musical stimulus, and that mothers of infants experience negative affect and cognitive interference comparable to the non-parent young adults.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18850
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Psychology - Master theses

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