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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18855

Title: Aging and Implicit Memory for Emotional Words
Authors: Saverino, Cristina
Advisor: Grady, Cheryl L.
Department: Psychology
Keywords: emotion
implicit memory
aging
cognitive control
word fragment completion
Issue Date: 15-Feb-2010
Abstract: The present study investigated age differences in implicit memory for positive, negative and neutral words. We also explored how cognitive control and time of testing influence emotional memory. Participants completed a one-back picture comparison task with superimposed distracting emotional and neutral words. Memory for distracting words was tested using an implicit memory test and cognitive control by a flanker task. Priming was significant for negative but not for positive and neutral words. Memory for distracting negative words was greater at non-optimal times of day for young adults but similar across the day for older adults. A high level of cognitive control was related to greater priming for negative words in young adults and lower priming in older adults. Priming for neutral words was enhanced in high cognitive control participants when stimuli contained emotional words that were relevant to one’s goals, implicating the use of emotion regulation at an unconscious level.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18855
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Psychology - Master theses

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