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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18888

Title: Post Exercise Hypotension and Blood Pressure Circadan Rhythm in Pre-hypertensive Older Adults
Authors: Spragg, Carly Marie
Advisor: Thomas, Scott
Department: Exercise Sciences
Keywords: Pre-Hypertensive
Post Exercise Hypotension
Circadian Rhythm
Older Adults
Issue Date: 15-Feb-2010
Abstract: Pre-hypertension (pre-HT) (Blood Pressure (BP) ≥120/80mmHg to ≤ 140/90mmHg) increases the risk of developing hypertension (HT). BP reductions following acute exercise are known as post exercise hypotension (PEH). BP and perhaps PEH shows a daily circadian rhythm. Purpose: To compare the magnitude of PEH after morning and evening aerobic exercise in adults with pre-HT. Hypothesis: The magnitude of PEH will be larger after evening versus morning exercise. Participants: Pre-HT men and women 50-65 years old. Study Design: Participants engaged in cycling exercise (60% VO2max) on two occasions: 1.5 and 11 hours following waking. Cardiovascular function was assessed for 30 minutes pre and one hour post exercise. Results: 1) Systolic PEH responses affected by TOD differed by gender. 2) Baseline Heart Rate Variability and its response to exercise differed gender but not TOD. The inconsistent significant gender and TOD differences of PEH and its mechanisms suggest that this group.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18888
Appears in Collections:Master
Graduate Department of Exercise Sciences - Master theses

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