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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18907

Title: Investigating the Mechanisms of Rupture and Dewetting of Quiescent Thin Films
Authors: Mulji, Neil Maheshchandra
Advisor: Chandra, Sanjeev
Department: Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Keywords: Thin Films
Rupture
Dewetting
Surface Roughness
Protrusions
Air Entrapment
Issue Date: 15-Feb-2010
Abstract: Controlling and predicting rupture and dewetting of quiescent thin water films, hundreds of microns thick, was studied experimentally. Wax, polycarbonate, steel and aluminium surfaces were immersed in water; the water level was lowered to form thin films above the surfaces. Spontaneous film rupture only occurred on wax, a low-energy surface. Films ruptured at the edges of the other—high-energy—surfaces. Increased surface roughness decreased chances of rupture and dewetting in the film. Introducing large wax or steel protrusions (on the order of millimetres) on smooth surfaces showed films rupturing above the protrusions and adhering to them; further thinning caused rupture and dewetting away from the protrusions. Entrapped air bubbles, injected through the surface and into the film, ruptured as they breached the film surface to form stable holes in the film if it was sufficiently thin. Entrapped air was the best means of rupturing films on all surfaces.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18907
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering - Master theses

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