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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18918

Title: Implantable Biosensors for Neural Imaging: A Study of Optical Modeling and Light Sources
Authors: Munro, Elizabeth Alice
Advisor: Levi, Ofer
Department: Biomedical Engineering
Keywords: Laser
Brain
Imaging
Modeling
Coherence noise
Neurophotonics
Biophotonics
Biosensor
Optical
Light source
Speckle
Light emitting diode
Issue Date: 15-Feb-2010
Abstract: We aim to develop an implantable, optical neural imaging device by fabricating lasers and photodiodes onto a gallium arsenide substrate. Some studies suggest that lasers exhibit higher noise than light emitting diodes (LEDs) due to coherence effects – my studies aim to quantify this noise and to guide device development. To this end, I developed a model of a fluorescent imaging device which agreed with experiment. Noise analysis performed in phantom showed that laser sources exhibit temporal and spatial noise up to 10x higher than LED sources, and in vivo noise analysis also demonstrated this trend. I studied a neural injury model called cortical spreading depression in vitro in mouse brain slices and in vivo in the rat brain using laser and LED sources. Signal magnitudes in vitro are on the order of 10% and in vivo results are inconclusive. Future work will aim to reduce coherence related noise.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18918
Appears in Collections:Master
Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering - Master theses

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