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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18933

Title: Predictors of Peritonitis Among Canadian Peritoneal Dialysis Patients
Authors: Nessim, Sharon J.
Advisor: Jassal, Sarbjit Vanita
Department: Medical Science
Keywords: peritoneal dialysis
peritonitis
predictors
Issue Date: 15-Feb-2010
Abstract: Despite the decreasing incidence of peritoneal dialysis (PD) peritonitis over time, its occurrence is still associated with adverse outcomes. This thesis focuses on determining factors associated with PD peritonitis in order to facilitate identification of patients at risk. Using data collected in a multicentre Canadian database between 1996 and 2005, the study population comprised 4,247 incident PD patients, of whom 1,605 had at least one peritonitis episode. Variables independently associated with peritonitis included age [rate ratio (RR) 1.04 per decade increase, 95% CI 1.01-1.08], Black race (RR 1.37, 95% CI 1.00-1.88) and having transferred from hemodialysis (RR 1.24, 95% CI 1.11-1.38). There was an interaction between gender and diabetes (p=0.011), with an increased peritonitis risk only among female diabetics (RR 1.27, 95% CI 1.10-1.47). Choice of continuous ambulatory PD vs. automated PD did not influence peritonitis risk. These results contribute to our understanding of peritonitis risk among PD patients.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18933
Appears in Collections:Master
Institute of Medical Science - Master theses

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