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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18945

Title: The Effect of Sodium Doping on Calcium Polyphosphate
Authors: Ue, Judy Wai-Tak
Advisor: Coyle, Thomas W.
Grynpas, Marc D.
Department: Materials Science and Engineering
Keywords: calcium polyphosphate
sodium
Issue Date: 16-Feb-2010
Abstract: Calcium polyphosphate (CPP) is a suitable substrate in a novel tissue-engineering strategy. The strategy aims to culture articular cartilage in vitro onto porous CPP and then implant the biphasic construct into the joint to replace damaged cartilage. CPP substrates should degrade faster to enhance repair. This project examined the structural and degradation effects of doping CPP with sodium phosphate, sodium hydroxide, and sodium carbonate. Doping concentration was narrowed to 0.01 Na2O/CaO for comparable phase composition to pure CPP. All doped groups sintered and crystallized at lower temperatures than pure CPP. Hydroxide-doped CPP did not form adequate sinter necks. At similar open porosity, Phosphate-doped CPP had similar diametral strength than pure CPP, while Carbonate-doped CPP had greater diametral strength. Degradation in vitro showed that Phosphate-doped CPP had greater strength loss, while Carbonate-doped CPP had similar strength loss, compared to pure CPP. Both doped groups degraded more slowly than pure CPP.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18945
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Materials Science & Engineering - Master theses

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