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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18947

Title: The Investigation and Development of Mechanical Resonance Tissue Analysis and the Relationship to Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry and Quantitative Ultrasound
Authors: Vernest, Kyle
Advisor: Cheung, Angela M.
Department: Biomedical Engineering
Keywords: Bone
Quality
Strength
Ulna
MRTA
Issue Date: 16-Feb-2010
Abstract: Currently Dual energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) and Quantitative Ultrasound (QUS) are used readily in the clinical environment for the assessment of bone quality. However, neither measure is a direct mechanical measure of bone. A Mechanical Resonance Tissue Analyzer (MRTA) has been developed that looks at the ulna’s deformation curve to vibration to achieve the measure of EI, cross sectional bending stiffness. This study investigated the relationships between MRTA to that of QUS and DXA. Regression analysis found significant linear correlations between EI to BMD and BMC, however, no significant relationships were found between EI and the variables of QUS. However, this technology is seen to have a potential for the assessment of in vivo bone quality. Furthermore, an improved configuration of the MRTA device is described, in addition to how preliminary results correspond to theoretical results.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18947
Appears in Collections:Master
Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering - Master theses

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