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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18970

Title: Halogen Activation from Sea Ice: Nitrate Photolysis and Heterogeneous Reaction with Ozone
Authors: Oldridge, T. Nathan William
Advisor: Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.
Department: Chemistry
Keywords: bromine
activation
heterogeneous
ozone
nitrate
photolysis
Langmuir-Hinshelwood
ice
Arctic
halogen
Issue Date: 16-Feb-2010
Abstract: Oxidation of aqueous bromide into reactive, gas-phase bromine species has been of interest since the 1980’s, when the presence of bromine in the Arctic boundary layer was linked to ozone depletion events. We have investigated two different mechanisms for Br2 release from sea ice. We have shown that nitrate in sea ice can photolyze to produce OH, which can go on to form gas-phase Br2. This reaction is analogous to a known reaction that occurs in the aqueous phase. We have also investigated Br2 production from a heterogeneous reaction between gas-phase ozone and sea ice/seawater. We have determined ozone’s reactive uptake coefficient, and have shown how it varies with temperature, bromide concentration, ozone concentration and acidity. We have been able to decouple the bulk aqueous chemistry that occurs from the Langmuir-Hinshelwood surface chemistry, and quantify the relative contribution of each.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18970
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Chemistry - Master theses

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