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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18971

Title: Stress Corrosion Crack Nucleation in Alloy 600 and the Effect of Surface Modification
Authors: Pakravan, Alaleh
Advisor: Newman, Roger C.
Department: Materials Science and Engineering
Keywords: Stress Corrosion Cracking
Alloy 600
SMAT
Indentation
Issue Date: 16-Feb-2010
Abstract: The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) condition for Alloy 600 was determined for various stress modes: constant-strain standard C-ring, and indentation, used to localize cracks for interrogation with x-ray techniques such as micro Laue diffraction (MLD). The SCC cracks nucleated on both the indentation edge, where finite element analysis showed that the maximum residual tensile stresses lie, and the surface in tension (bulge) on 150-kgf conically indented mill-annealed specimens (0.02 wt% C) in de-aerated solution of 10% caustic at 150 mVRE (pseudo-reference: A600), 315 OC for 48 hr. On the C-rings, the cracks nucleated at the lateral outer surface of apex, where maximum tensile stresses lie, in less than 12 hours, and propagated into the cross section. Also, corrosion tests on as-received A600 30-min ZrO2 surface mechanical attrition treated (SMAT) specimens suggested an intergranular attack type of behavior in 50% caustic at 210 mVRE (pseudo-reference: A600), 280°C for 24 hr.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18971
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Materials Science & Engineering - Master theses

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