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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18976

Title: The Role of Intravenous Immunoglobulin Anti-A and Anti-B in Complement Activation and Red Blood Cell Phagocytosis
Authors: Daniella, Perri
Advisor: Denomme, Gregory
Department: Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology
Keywords: Immunohematology
Issue Date: 16-Feb-2010
Abstract: Intravenous immunoglobulin is a human blood derived product that is used to treat immunodeficiencies and autoimmune disorders. An adverse side effect of IVIg therapy is hemolysis. Patients who experience hemolysis are mainly blood group A or AB. Clinical laboratory studies have demonstrated that IVIg contains ABO blood group antibodies, which can bind complement proteins. This study hypothesizes that anti-A/B in IVIg will bind to A/B antigens and activate complement in a dose dependant manner, which may lead to enhanced RBC phagocytosis. This study observed that the quantity of ABO antigens does not affect the in vitro binding of IVIg to RBCs. IVIg induced C3b deposition at high doses; however, the amount of complement deposition was insufficient to enhance phagocytosis of IVIg-sensitized RBCs by monocytic THP-1 cells in vitro. These studies emphasize that hemolytic reactions involve many factors in conjunction with antibodies and complement proteins.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18976
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology - Master theses

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