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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18988

Title: Increased Fixation Distance during Search among Familiar Distractors: Eve-movement Evidence of Distractor Grouping
Authors: Walker, Robin
Advisor: Reingold, Eyal M.
Department: Psychology
Keywords: Distractor Familiarity
Eye Movements
Issue Date: 17-Feb-2010
Abstract: The present study tested the hypothesis that distractor-based facilitation of visual search occurs because familiar distractors are processed and rejected in groups. We recorded participants’ eye movements during a visual search task to determine if familiar distractors were associated with an increased average distance between fixations and distractors. The study provided convergent evidence of a strong relation between search efficiency and distractor familiarity, wherein the distance between fixations and distractors increases with the efficiency of search. Further examination of eye movements suggested that the grouping of familiar distractors resulted in an efficient scanning of the search display by increasing the area of the display effectively processed during each fixation and therefore reducing the need to fixate individual distractors.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18988
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Psychology - Master theses

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