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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18999

Title: Source Tracing of Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM) in Watersheds Using UV and Fluorescence Spectroscopy
Authors: Wong, Jessica
Advisor: Williams, D. Dudley
Department: Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Keywords: streams
detrital energy
ecosystem ecology
spectroscopy
dissolved organic matter
carbon cycling
Issue Date: 17-Feb-2010
Abstract: In aquatic ecosystems, dissolved organic matter (DOM) is an important source of detrital energy on which microorganisms rely. However, its dynamics are not well understood in an ecological context. By isolating watershed sources, the work reported in this thesis has attempted to characterize the seasonal patterns of DOM in the hyporheic zone of a temperate stream and to find the likely sources that contribute to this pool of organic carbon. Hyporheic DOM characteristics described by UV spectroscopy indicated temporal rather than spatial dependence. Excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) showed that hyporheic DOM was mainly comprised of fulvic- and humic-like fluorescence with small amounts of protein-like fluorescence. Increases in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations from birch litter isolates were greater than those from cedar litter in early autumn, but less in late autumn. Although streambed biofilm was not significant in increasing DOC concentrations, it was also a source of protein-like fluorescence.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18999
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology - Master theses

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