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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/19002

Title: On the Design of Peer-assisted Video-on-demand Systems
Authors: Wu, Jiahua
Advisor: Li, Baochun
Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering
Keywords: Peer-to-Peer
Video-on-Demand
Optimization
Issue Date: 17-Feb-2010
Abstract: Peer-assisted Video-on-Demand (VoD) systems have not only received substantial recent research attention, but also been implemented and deployed with success in large-scale real-world streaming systems. Despite the remarkable popularity in real-world systems, the design of such systems are not well understood. In this thesis, we seek to address two design problems in peer-assisted VoD systems. First, we focus on the design of cache replacement algorithms. We construct an analytical framework based on dynamic programming, to help us form an in-depth understanding of optimal strategies to design cache replacement algorithms. Second, we shift our attention to the surplus upload bandwidth allocation problem in multi-channel systems. Through theoretical analysis and realistic simulations, we conclude that surplus upload bandwidth from peers can be utilized more efficiently than conventional prefetching strategies when it is devoted to redistributing content to those channels in deficit state.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/19002
Appears in Collections:Master
The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering - Master theses

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