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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/19009

Title: Potassium Changing from Pro- to Anti-convulsant in the Epileptic Juvenile Rat Hippocampus
Authors: Yu, Wilson Jonathan
Advisor: Carlen, Peter Louis
Department: Physiology
Keywords: Potassium
Epilepsy
Seizure
Hippocampus
Ih
Issue Date: 17-Feb-2010
Abstract: Elevations in extracellular potassium (K+e) accompany seizure-like events (SLEs), but elevated K+ may also participate in seizure cessation. The objective of this thesis was to investigate the possibility that K+ may undergo a pro- to anti-convulsant switch in the epileptic juvenile (postnatal day 17-21) rat hippocampus. Field recordings were performed in the CA1 pyramidal layer. SLEs and primary afterdischarges (PADs) were induced with 0.25 mM Mg/5 mM K+ perfusion or tetanic stimulation of the Schaffer collaterals respectively. In these seizure models, elevating [K+]e beyond 7.5 mM showed anticonvulsant properties. The addition of ZD7288, a blocker of the hyperpolarization activated nonspecific cationic current (Ih) and allowed SLEs to continue even in elevated [K+]e. This suggests that [K+]e switches from being pro- to anti-convulsant, in part due to an elevated [K+]e-induced potentiation of Ih. Ih likely contributes to this anticonvulsant behavior by decreasing membrane resistance and subsequently attenuating summation of incoming EPSPs.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/19009
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Physiology - Master theses

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