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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/19011

Title: Towards Sustainable Development: Chinese Environmental Law Enforcement Mechanism Research
Authors: Zhang, Yikai Jr.
Advisor: Ho, Betty
Department: Law
Keywords: Chinese environmental law
Sustainable development principle
Issue Date: 17-Feb-2010
Abstract: Environmental degradation is one of the most important problems facing by Chinese people. This unsatisfactory situation majorly lies in the weak implementation of environmental laws. The essential reason causing the ineffective enforcement of Chinese environmental law is people’s distorted cognition about the relation between human being and the environment. As an important principle of international environmental law, the sustainable development principle emphasizes intra-generational and intergenerational equality, aiming to realize a balance of environmental interest and socie-economic interest, which could become the guideline of the reformation of Chinese environmental law enforcement mechanism. At last, this paper analyzes the solutions to appeared problems, which are underpinned by the sustainable development principle. The ultimate purpose is to promote rational policies and responsible conducts of governments, to foster enterprises’ voluntary compliance with environmental law and to foster citizens’ environmental awareness.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/19011
Appears in Collections:Master
Faculty of Law - Master theses

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