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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/19013

Title: Metakaolin Effects on Concrete Durability
Authors: Zeljkovic, J. Michael
Advisor: Hooton, Robert Douglas
Department: Civil Engineering
Keywords: Metakaolin
Sulphate Attack
Chloride
ASR
Issue Date: 18-Feb-2010
Abstract: Partial replacement of cement by metakaolin is known to improve concrete durability, by refining the pore structure to improve fluid transport properties and by reducing the alkalinity of the pore solution to make ASR less problematic. A gap exists in the literature as to the salt scaling performance and magnesium sulphate performance of metakaolin concrete. 10 concrete mixes were cast at w/cm ratios of 0.4 and 0.5. In addition to metakaolin, grade 80 slag was used as well as CSA GU cement. All replacement levels were tested for setting properties, compressive strength, drying shrinkage, sulphate resistance, salt scaling, ASR mitigation and chloride diffusion characteristics according to the appropriate CSA and ASTM standards. It was found that metakaolin showed better performance in magnesium sulphate solutions than slag and that metakaolin concretes attained strength and other durability properties much faster than mixes without it. Keywords: metakaolin, ASR, sulphate, magnesium, scaling, setting, diffusion
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/19013
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Civil Engineering - Master theses

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