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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/1927

Title: An overview of the microbial α-amylase family
Authors: Reddy, N. S.
Nimmagadda, Annapoorna
Sambasiva Rao, K. R. S.
Keywords: Biotechnology
α-Amylase, TIM barrel, glycosylhydrolases jb03116
Issue Date: Dec-2003
Publisher: Academic Journals
Citation: African Journal of Biotechnology 2(12)
Abstract: Amylases are enzymes which hydrolyze the starch molecules into polymers composed of glucose units. α-Amylases are ubiquitous in distribution, with plants, bacteria and fungi being the predominant sources. Most of the microbial α-amylases belong to the family 13 glycosyl hydrolases, and they share several common properties. But different reaction specificities have been observed across the family members. Structurally α-amylases possess (β/α)8 or TIM barrel structures and are responsible for hydrolysis or formation of glycosidic bonds in the α-conformation. Stability of the α-amylases has been widely studied; pH and temperature have very important roles to play. Engineering the enzymes for improved stability enhances their use industrially. This review focuses on the distribution, structural-functional aspects and factors for enhancing the stability of α-amylases.
URI: http://bioline.utsc.utoronto.ca/archive/00001131/01/jb03116.pdf
http://hdl.handle.net/1807/1927
Appears in Collections:Bioline International Legacy Collection

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