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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/20844


Title: Paediatrics in India
Authors: Tullu, M. S.
Kamat, Jaishree R.
Issue Date: 31-Dec-2000
Publisher: Medknow Publications and Staff Society of Seth GS Medical College and KEM Hospital, Mumbai, India
Citation: Journal of Postgraduate Medicine (ISSN: 0972-2823) Vol 46 Num 3
Abstract: Our rich heritage of Ayurveda has detailed description of maternal and child health care. Sushruta in his Sushruta Samhita, had devoted a chapter to Kaumarabrita (service to children).1 This was perhaps the first record of Paediatrics in ancient India. Paediatrics was called Kaumarbhritya tantra.2 The Atharva Veda (1500 BC) describes children's diseases and Kaushika Sutra included Paediatrics.1,2 Kashyapa and Jeevaka (400 BC) were well known Paediatricians of ancient India.1,2 Kashyapa Samhita deals exclusively with Paediatrics.1,2 Charaka wrote in details about the care and management of newborn in Sarira-Sthana and Ashtanga-Hridaya.1 The Charaka Samhita in fact mentions an international conference of scholars.2 Kaumarbhritya and Prasuti tantra talk of prenatal care, and also lay emphasis on neonatal care, care of the baby including feeding and management of illnesses of children.3 This includes - maternal care (with respect to food, drink, leisure, restricted work, sleep, etc.), neonatal care (cleaning, dressing, bath, procedure akin to cardiac compression), care of the umbilical cord, breast feeding (including concept of a wet nurse), annaprasana (initial eating of solid food), daily care of eyes and skin, and common symptomatology in childhood illnesses.2,3
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/20844
Other Identifiers: http://www.bioline.org.br/abstract?id=jp00080
Rights: Copyright 2000 Journal of Postgraduate Medicine. Online full text also at http://www.jpgmonline.com
Appears in Collections:Bioline International Legacy Collection

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