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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/20848


Title: SUGARBEET LEAF GROWTH AND YIELD RESPONSE TO SOIL WATER DEFICIT
Authors: Abayomi, Y. A.
Wright, D.
Keywords: Beta vulgaris   , irrigation, leaf area index, leaf extension rate, water stress
Beta vulgaris   , irrigation, indice de surface foliaire, taux d'accroissement des feuilles, carence en eau
Issue Date: 31-Dec-2002
Publisher: African Crop Science Society
Citation: African Crop Science Journal (ISSN: 1021-9730) Vol 10 Num 1
Abstract: There are conflicting reports about the sensitivity of sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris   L.) to water stress during different growth stages. Although, it is generally believed that the crop benefits from irrigation, opinions still differ as to which growth stage irrigation should be applied. This study evaluated the responses of sugarbeet leaf growth, sugar yield and yield components to soil water deficit imposed at various periods during growth in a glasshouse. Leaf growth showed high sensitivity to soil water deficit and responses varied with periods at which the deficit occurred. Water deficit early in the growing season had larger effects on leaf growth, leaf extension rate (LER), area of individual leaf, and leaf area index (LAI). Mid- or late-season soil water deficit showed relatively smaller effects on leaf growth. Re-watering resulted in compensatory leaf growth in early stressed plants. Both early (ES) and late (LS) soil water deficit decreased sugar yield and sugar concentrations. However, there were no significant (P<0.05) differences in the severity of effects of ES and LS, thus, no evidence to suggest that any particular growth stage is more sensitive to water stress than the other.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/20848
Other Identifiers: http://www.bioline.org.br/abstract?id=cs02006
Rights: Copyright 2002 - African Crop Science Society
Appears in Collections:Bioline International Legacy Collection

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