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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/21141


Title: Symptomatic Small Non-Obstructing Lower Ureteric Calculi: Comparison of Ureteroscopy and Extra Corporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy
Authors: Andankar, M. G.
Maheshwari, P. N.
Saple, A. L.
Mehta, V.
Varshney, A.
Bansal, B.
Keywords: Ureteric calculi, Urinary calculi, Ureteroscopy, ESWL, Lithotripsy
Issue Date: 31-Dec-2001
Publisher: Medknow Publications and Staff Society of Seth GS Medical College and KEM Hospital, Mumbai, India
Citation: Journal of Postgraduate Medicine (ISSN: 0972-2823) Vol 47 Num 3
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To compare the success, efficacy and complications of ureteroscopy (URS) and extra corporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) for the treatment of symptomatic small non obstructing lower ureteric calculi. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: This prospective non randomised study was conducted simultaneously at two urological referral centres, included 280 patients with symptomatic small (4 10 mm) lower ureteric calculi (situated below the sacroiliac joint), with good renal function on intravenous urography. Patients were offered both the treatment options. One hundred and sixty patients chose ureteroscopy, whereas 120 patients were treated by ESWL. Standard techniques of ureteroscopy and ESWL were employed. Patients were followed-up to assess the success rates and complications of the two procedures. RESULTS: Ureteroscopy achieved complete stone clearance in one session in 95% of patients. In six patients ureteroscopy had failed initially and was later accomplished in second session improving the success rate to 98.7%. Two patients had a proximal migration of calculus that needed ESWL. Of the 120 patients treated by ESWL, 90% achieved stone free status at three months. Ureteroscopy was needed for twelve patients (10%) where ESWL failed to achieve stone clearance. There were no significant ESWL related complications. ESWL was administered on outpatient basis, while patients needed hospitalisation and anaesthesia for ureteroscopy. CONCLUSION: ESWL can be the primary mode of treatment for symptomatic small non-obstructing lower ureteric calculi as it is minimally invasive and safe. Ureteroscopy can be offered to patients who demand immediate relief or when ESWL fails.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/21141
Other Identifiers: http://www.bioline.org.br/abstract?id=jp01050
Rights: Copyright 2001 Journal of Postgraduate Medicine. Online full text also at http://www.jpgmonline.com
Appears in Collections:Bioline International Legacy Collection

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