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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/22916


Title: GENETIC VARIATION IN BANANA CULTIVAR 'SUKALI NDIZI' GROWN IN DIFFERENT REGIONS OF UGANDA
Authors: Pillay, M.
Dimkpa, C.
Ude, G.
Makumbi, D.
Tushemereirwe, W.
Keywords: AFLP, germplasm, Musa   , primers, RAPD, somatic mutations, Uganda
AFLP, germoplasme, Musa   , premiers, RAPD, mutations somatiques, Ouganda
Issue Date: 31-Dec-2003
Publisher: African Crop Science Society
Citation: African Crop Science Journal (ISSN: 1021-9730) Vol 11 Num 2
Abstract: Banana is an important food and cash crop in Uganda. The crop displays wide diversity but the genetic relationship between and withing cultivars is largely unknown. A study was conducted to assess genetic relationships among 'Sukali Ndizi' clones collected from 16 different localities in Uganda using the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) techniques. Thirty-four RAPD primers used singly and in combination produced 234 unambiguous bands. The RAPD primers produced identical banding patterns in all the samples and were, therefore, not useful in differentiating the clones. However, the 9 AFLP primer pairs produced 554 fragments, 17 of which were polymorphic. Genetic relationships were established from the AFLP data by cluster analysis. Two groups of clones were clearly defined. Clones from selected contiguous districts such as Lira and Soroti, Bushenyi and Kasese districts were highly similar. Other closely related clones were from disjunctive localities. The similarity of the clones in adjacent districts is attributed to local exchange of germplasm, while similarity of clones in non-contiguous districts is probably the result of more purposeful and selective transfer of planting material. In general, the observed clonal variation may be due to somatic mutations.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/22916
Other Identifiers: http://www.bioline.org.br/abstract?id=cs03011
Rights: Copyright 2003 - African Crop Science Society
Appears in Collections:Bioline International Legacy Collection

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