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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24225

Title: Governing Lived Embodiment: Autism, Asperger's and Care
Authors: Douglas, Patricia
Advisor: Titchkosky, Tanya
Department: Sociology and Equity Studies in Education
Keywords: sociology
interpretive disability studies
women's studies
governmentality
Issue Date: 5-Apr-2010
Abstract: This thesis brings interpretive disability studies together with a governmentality approach and feminist methodology to think through the meaning of autism, Asperger’s and maternal care. I examine how Asperger’s is articulated as a problem of individual governance through what I call the care complex, an array of practices, knowledges, technologies and institutional locales that attempt to scientifically know and manage alterity under neo-liberal rule. I focus on discourses of inclusion that seek to normalise the movements of alterity through a mother’s care, and reveal how direct and authoritarian forms of power are integral to the accomplishment of this paradoxical version of inclusion and care. The aim of this thesis is to “take care” of autism differently. Thus I also consider how maternal care is lived out and felt, opening analytical space to ask critical questions about power, embodiment and human vulnerability.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24225
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Sociology and Equity Studies in Education - Master theses

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