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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24234

Title: DREAM-mediated Regulation of GCM1 in the Human Placental Trophoblast
Authors: Baczyk, Dorota
Advisor: Lye, Stephen J.
Department: Physiology
Keywords: placenta
transcriptional regulation
Issue Date: 5-Apr-2010
Abstract: The trophoblast transcription factor glial cell missing-1 (GCM1) regulates asymmetric division of placental cytotrophoblast to form the differentiated syncytiotrophoblast. Reduced GCM1 expression is a key feature of the hypertensive disorder preeclampsia. In-silico techniques identified a novel calcium-dependent transcriptional repressor – DREAM as a regulatory candidate for GCM1. The overall objective of this thesis was to determine if DREAM regulates GCM1 expression and therefore villous trophoblast turnover. siRNA-mediated DREAM silencing in both BeWo cells and floating villous explants significantly upregulated GCM1 causing reduced cytotrophoblast proliferation. Calcium-dependency was demonstrated in both BeWo cells and floating villous explants by contrasting the effects of ionomycin and nimodipine. A direct interaction between DREAM and the GCM1 promoter was demonstrated using EMSA and ChIP assay. DREAM is a negative upstream regulator of GCM1 expression in human placenta that participates in calcium-dependent trophoblast differentiation.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24234
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Physiology - Master theses

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