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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24256

Title: Phenotypic and Functional Characteristics of the IgM-IgD+ Naive B Cell Population in SLE Patients
Authors: Kim, Julie Jisun
Advisor: Wither, Joan
Department: Immunology
Keywords: B cell
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
human
anergy
Issue Date: 6-Apr-2010
Abstract: The presence of autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) suggests a breach of tolerance. Recently, the IgM-IgD+ naïve B cell population has been shown to be enriched for self-reactive cells that are anergic in healthy subjects. Therefore, to determine whether there is altered selection of self-reactive cells in SLE, this population was examined using multiparameter flow cytometry. SLE patients had increased proportions of IgM-IgD+ cells in mature and transitional B cell compartments that were activated as compared to controls. Comparison of mature and transitional IgM-IgD+ B cell proportions suggested altered selection between the transitional to mature stages in SLE. There was no correlation between altered B cell function or genetic polymorphisms in B cell signalling molecules and the expansion or activation of IgM-IgD+ cells. Thus, selection of self-reactive B cells appears to be abnormal in SLE, but this does not appear to result from altered responses to Ig crosslinking.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24256
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Immunology - Master theses

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