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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24268

Title: Transparent Conductive Oxides for Organic Photovoltaics
Authors: Murdoch, Graham
Advisor: Lu, Zhenghong
Department: Materials Science and Engineering
Keywords: organic electronics
transparent conductors
Issue Date: 6-Apr-2010
Abstract: Organic solar cells and organic light emitting diodes are on the forefront of emerging technologies aimed at harnessing light in ways never thought possible. Largear installations of OLED solid state lighting (SSL), as well as organic photovoltaics(OPVs), will become possible as the efficiencies of these devices continue to rise. All organic solar cells and OLEDs require the use of transparent conductive electrodes.Indium oxide (ITO) is currently the transparent conductor of choice for these applications, due to its unique combination of transparency, high conductivity, durability,and favourable surface properties. Indium, however, is a rare and expensive metal; proposed large-area installations of OPV cells and OLEDs will add further strain to global indium supply. Transparent conductive materials that are abundant, inexpensive, and which enable efficient and robust organic devices must therefore be developed. In the present work, suitable ITO anode replacement materials are demonstrated for OLEDS, small-molecule, polymer, and PbS colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24268
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Materials Science & Engineering - Master theses

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