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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24269

Title: Seismic Analysis of Steel Wind Turbine Towers in the Canadian Environment
Authors: Nuta, Elena
Advisor: Christopoulos, Constantin
Packer, Jeffrey A.
Department: Civil Engineering
Keywords: wind turbine tower
tubular steel
seismic analysis
finite element
incremental dynamic analysis
probability of damage
seismic hazard
Issue Date: 6-Apr-2010
Abstract: The seismic response of steel monopole wind turbine towers is investigated and their risk is assessed in the Canadian seismic environment. This topic is of concern as wind turbines are increasingly being installed in seismic areas and design codes do not clearly address this aspect of design. An implicit finite element model of a 1.65MW tower was developed and validated. Incremental dynamic analysis was carried out to evaluate its behaviour under seismic excitation, to define several damage states, and to develop a framework for determining its probability of damage. This framework was implemented in two Canadian locations, where the risk was found to be low for the seismic hazard level prescribed for buildings. However, the design of wind turbine towers is subject to change, as is the design spectrum. Thus, a methodology is outlined to thoroughly investigate the probability of reaching predetermined damage states under seismic loading for future considerations.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24269
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Civil Engineering - Master theses

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