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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24270

Title: Development of an Enzyme Immunoassay and Cellular Function Assays to Probe the Function of Teneurin C-terminal Associated Peptide (TCAP)
Authors: Nock, Tanya Gwendolyn
Advisor: Lovejoy, David A.
Department: Cell and Systems Biology
Keywords: ELISA
reporter
TCAP
teneurin
cFos
solubility
solution
immunoassay
peptide
signal transduction
neuron
promoter element
Issue Date: 6-Apr-2010
Abstract: The teneurin C-terminal associated peptides (TCAP) are a family of four predicted peptides that are expressed in all metazoans where the teneurins have been studied to date. Of the four peptides, TCAP-1 has been studied most extensively. In vitro, TCAP-1 increases neuronal proliferation and neurite outgrowth. In vivo, the peptide reduces CRF-induced behavioural responses in rats. Despite the large body of evidence indicating a strong biological role for TCAP-1, little is known about the chemistry and solubility of the peptide, or the signaling pathway(s) mediating these effects. The aim of this research was to appropriately solubilize the peptide and to develop detection assays for its study in greater detail. I have now established an appropriate formulation of TCAP-1 and developed an immunoassay to assess its concentrations in tissues and in circulation. Also, by examining a number of transcriptional response elements, I have found two assays for probing the signal transduction mechanisms of this peptide.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/24270
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Cell and Systems Biology - Master theses

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